SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

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SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby EC NEWELLMAN » Sun Sep 05, 2010 10:27 pm

If there was one tv show I have never forgotten as a kid (besides the Mets and Jets winning in 1969), was the original NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC one hour special:

The Lonely Men of the Dories


This is an incredibly rare VIDEO that recorded the end of the era of the Portuguese Cod Schooner fleet, specifically the last of the cod fishermen who fished along the Grand Banks in wooden dories. It is a story that gives a glimpse into time (almost 5 decades ago) of fishermen using tarred lines, rowing out to spots without any electronics, to set their gear to hopefully catch cod.

You will get a idea on:

The amount of cod that used to be off the Grand Banks....and this was considered the end of the great cod catching era in the 1960s.

The salting process of codfish at sea.

Navigating back to your mother ship in the FOG and against currents up to 5 knots (compasses are relatively useless this close to the north pole)

Cod fishing tradition on the old ships.

True cod fish mariners.......

To Joe Prefessa....finally found it! Enjoy!

PART 1




PART 2




PART 3




PART 4




PART 5




PART 6




COD FISHING - WHITE FLEET 1966 - CONDENSED VERSION OF ABOVE



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Re: SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby Rodwinder » Mon Sep 06, 2010 6:25 am

Wow Steve, I remember watching this too
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Re: SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby NMSBob » Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:20 am

Great vid Steve, how do we get this one on a DVD before its gone?

Bob
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Re: SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby EC NEWELLMAN » Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:50 am

Morning Bob.....For years I have been trying to find out what ever happened to this rare documentary which is the only one I know of that filmed the lives of the Grand Banks cod dory fishermen. I have constantly been searching the net and finally someone did post the video (possibly foreign since the label is in Portuguese) in sections on YOU TUBE, edited into six parts.

Just recently I did speak to someone who was also looking for it, and was told that National Geographic was not going to air this in the US, and since the time it was aired, it has not been shown. They also did not have any intention of making a DVD which could be purchased, since this individual was willing to purchase it, if it was available, something very strange since National Geographic has produced the 120 years - National Geographic Collection on DVD, without this one special documentary on it.

The original title of this documentary was 'NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY SPECIALS' (1968) - LONELY DORYMAN: Portugal's Men of the Sea, which was aired on CBS (it was at 8 at night if I remember correctly) on 4/16/68, produced by David Seltzer & George Sluizer.

It may have been inspired by a LIFE MAGAZINE article on Dec 21st, 1962, where you can find a few pictures here:

THE GRAND BANKS - classic study of man's lonely life at sea, a Portuguese doryman tends his lines and tries to keep his mother ship in sight on a fog-shrouded day





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Re: SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby togilator » Mon Sep 06, 2010 12:32 pm

Great stuff Steve,Thanks for putting this up!
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Re: SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby togtooth01 » Mon Sep 06, 2010 3:41 pm

Cool vids and story!...Thanks for sharing!...

Joel
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Re: SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby nickh » Mon Sep 06, 2010 7:52 pm

Steve!!!! I've been lookinfg for this for almost 20 years! Saw it on TV when I was 13 or 14. Periodically I have tried to search the internet for it with no luck. Great to see the footage again. Great stuff! ;)
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Re: SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby nickh » Mon Sep 06, 2010 9:13 pm

It was reaired around in the very late 80's or verey early 90's. That was when I saw it.
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Re: SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby EC NEWELLMAN » Tue Sep 07, 2010 10:03 am

Image

Interesting Nick since this one video is one that I have asked about over the years, and no one can remember if it was re-aired since the last sixties. I did not see at the time you mentioned.

It was shot through 1966 and as someone told me, LOOK AT THE SEAS when the dories are rowing out...some are rough and then some are flat calm. Guess the editing department took some creative liberties when they were piecing it together to make the story flow in this one hour piece.

I also wondered if this was the last trip that was made since there was mention that this type of fishing was coming to an end as more modern ships, using more effecting methods were now fishing.

I don't know.

At the time the FOREIGN FLEETS of various countries had expanded to their largest point and were working from the Grand Banks, through right off the beaches off our coast. Though the Grand Banks was in decline, the fishing there was still productive enough for big fishing vessels to make catches there.

If you want to get some historic background about Cod Fishing on the Grand Banks by the fishing fleet from Gloucester, go here:

COMMERCIAL FISHERS - ATLANTIC COD


What is very interesting is that the 'dory' and its inherent design for fishing some of the roughest seas in the world, was relatively unchanged from when they were first built in our country. As pointed out in an article in Tide's Point Magazine - Dory Fishing in Newfoundland:

Credit for the invention of the dory goes to Simeon Lowell who came from England to Massachusetts. He turned out his first dory in 1793, The name Dory probably came from a redfish found in Nova Scotia waters called the `John Dory Fish`. The cost of a dory then was $ 12.00. The same dory today costs $1000.00. It is often called the Little Lady of the North Atlantic. As years went by fishermen from Newfoundland and Labrador did an excellent job of building their own dories.


DORY FISHERMEN OFF NEWFOUNDLAND


What has always captured my attention about this cod fishing in the dories was that they were universally similar in design, roughly 16 or so feet in length, had a high sheer at both ends with the center of the dory purposely made low to make it easier to pull large groundfish in caught on trawl gear inside the dory. They were efficient to move through the water, as the fishermen sometimes had to row countless miles constantly through rough seas during the fishing day, sometimes against currents that ran up to 5 knots!

Many were fitted with sails to aid them when necessary, but room was at a premium in the dory since the whole idea was to catch and fit as many cod inside its hull. Besides a small amount of a salted bait that was carried along, a day or so meal usually made up of dried cod and hardened biscuits, the trawl gear with up to or over 1000 hooks, and maybe one of the most essential tools along with the bait, a BAILER, room was extremely cramped.

As mentioned in both the video and in various stories written about these fishermen, a matter of pride among them was to be the HIGHLINER, the fishermen who could catch and 'stuff' the greatest amount in poundage in his small vessel, and navigate safely back to the mothership. The stories of the small dories being swamped were common on each and every trip, and as much as we think of other areas along our coast as being 'wreck valleys', the waters of and around the Grand Banks has been reported to have the largest number of vessels to have sunk throughout the last few centuries, much from the cod schooners and the much smaller dories that plied these waters.

There was a human interest story written for the NY TIMES in 2005 that gives an excellent synopsis about the ground fishermen and their dories:

The Fish Are Few and the Fishermen Fewer, but the Dory Will Not Die


One paragraph which really drives home for us fishermen about the dory and what it was made of:

Hearing firsthand how the boats were used when they were technologically functional increased my admiration for the fishermen. And it left no room for nostalgia. Captain Mitchell said the dories were used for a year or two, three at most. If one was damaged, it wasn't repaired; it was easier to get a new one. They were meant to be used up. And he told me he got out of the dories as soon as he could. He eventually became a captain of a fishing trawler.


He points out at the start of the article, that a 15 foot dory (imagine something barely bigger then the 13 foot Boston Whaler) could hold 2 men and 2000 lbs of codfish and would fish and travel to and from the mothership in seas worst then anything you could imagine, repeated daily throughout the fishing season.

There was an interesting book written about fishing on the Grand Banks (fictional story) that was written by Bill Freeman in the seventies:

Image

For those interested in American fishing history about the wooden dory schooners, this one book is the story about the last schooner. It is written from a modern perspective looking back at the history, methods and the fishermen who worked on those ships out of an American fishing port:

Last of the Dory-Fishing Schooners - Text by Joseph E Garland
Research by Captain Jim Sharp


Image


A chronicle, unequalled, of the Grand Banks dory-fishing schooners. It illustrates in pictures and text the hard-bitten way of the dory man and the schooners that were his life in an industry that has faded away with the influx of modern methods.

Launched in Essex, Mass., in 1926, the 121-foot wooden schooner Adventure of Gloucester was already old and worn when she was laid up in 1953. She was the very last American vessel to catch fish by hand from small dories, yet was one of the biggest moneymakers in the history of the fisheries.


One final point about the above book is the year that this fishing schooner was launched, 1926. In another book Caught in irons: North Atlantic fishermen in the last days of sail By Michael Wayne Santos, he writes that by the 1920's that the dory fishermen was a 'aging profession' that native born Americans shied away from due to its inherent dangers. Foreign immigrants from Italy and Portugal became the largest ethnic group who continued to work on these wooden ships post World War I. Most fishermen though preferred jobs on the more modern and larger eastern rigged trawlers that were being built, instead of offshore fishing in a dory.

In a line that gives you an idea of the age of the dory fishermen, on board the L.A. Dunston, the youngest crew member was just 23 years old, while most on board were 35 years old. One can only imagine the physical and mental shape these immigrant fishermen were in, figuratively speaking. They were fishing machines, hardened by wind, large seas. pea soap fog, and who had constantly experienced the horrors of friends in dories similar to their own, lost at sea in what truly was Americas most deadly profession at that time (though coal mining was not much further behind).

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Re: SEPT 5th - THE LONELY DORYMEN - THE LAST OF THE DORY COD FISHERMEN - THE VIDEO IS POSTED HERE!

Postby nickh » Tue Sep 07, 2010 4:30 pm

I found even more footage!

:lol:
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